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Bloodaxe
04-13-2006, 06:08 PM
Why's this part of the board soooo quiet? There are members in the UK and Eire- I've seen their postings, so why aren't they posting here? We do have the occasional beer in the British Isles(!) so a few more comments would be nice! Me. tonight- 3 pints of Ruddles County, 1 pint of Bombadier- off- threw it back! Resumed drinking with Belhaven 80shilling- splendid! Bus home, on computer, talking shite!

Erin W
04-13-2006, 09:59 PM
I would read this thread just to listen to your great ACCENTS!



So, just what IS new over the pond? Tax season here, but there are microwbrews, too (which make me happy once again to be breathing). I have a sister who's been to Ireland twice, but I've never been. Yet.
I've been keeping an eye peeled for Charles Welles' Banana Brew here in my area but I haven't even seen any of their stuff. Do they even export?
I'm a fruity beer freak but it definitely can't be cheesy, you know not too syrupy and should have a bold beer experience before you even get to the fruit part!!!!
I digress...
Any insight from your neck of the woods?


E

Bloodaxe
04-14-2006, 02:00 AM
Well, I've had the Charles Wells Banana Beer and it is quite nice. the banana taste is quite mild and not overwhelming although it does smell strongly of bananas. They do have a website- worth a look to see if they export at all? I suspect that as it's a cask ale it's the usual problems of travel, etc.
Otherwise, what to report? My own efforts to improve brewers profits in the area? I'm quite lucky as I have a good choice of watering holes with real ale, the one last night generally has 8 casks ales on all the time, 4 regulars and 4 guests, which gives the opportunity always to try something new. My main problem is I'm not fond of the lighter coloured beers which seem to be more popular these days and prefer something darker which I think are more flavoursome, but I'll struggle on with what I can get!

noby
04-14-2006, 03:45 AM
Today is one of only two days in the year that pubs are closed in Ireland; the other being Christmas day. So everyone was out "panic buying" last night. Maybe that's why it's quite in here.

We're having a bit of a house warming party tonight, so last night I stocked up on Guinness, Spitfire and Budvar, as it's hard to decide the day before what I might fancy.

Sadly, my batches of Stout and Lager won't be ready for a few weeks.

Bloodaxe
04-14-2006, 05:54 AM
You close on Xmas day in Eire- didn't know that! (I assume to it being a Catholic country). Here in the UK every bloke piles off to the pub for a few pints prior to Christmas dinner! Why is it that you can consume quite a lot of beer prior to a big dinner but not after it? Actually I've always wondered why a few pints in the afternoon always makes you want to nod off but doesn't have that same effect in the evening.
Well, I hope you manage on your survival rations until tomorrow Noby!

chazwicke
04-14-2006, 12:03 PM
Originally posted by Bloodaxe
Well, I've had the Charles Wells Banana Beer and it is quite nice. the banana taste is quite mild and not overwhelming although it does smell strongly of bananas. They do have a website- worth a look to see if they export at all? I suspect that as it's a cask ale it's the usual problems of travel, etc.
Otherwise, what to report? My own efforts to improve brewers profits in the area? I'm quite lucky as I have a good choice of watering holes with real ale, the one last night generally has 8 casks ales on all the time, 4 regulars and 4 guests, which gives the opportunity always to try something new. My main problem is I'm not fond of the lighter coloured beers which seem to be more popular these days and prefer something darker which I think are more flavoursome, but I'll struggle on with what I can get!

I've had the CW Banana bread brew. It was at the GBBF. They have an old red London bus that they run taps from. We used to get some of the Charles Wells beers here. Not sure if we still do.

Richard and I had pints Ruddles County on my last trip to London last month. I was quite suprised at how good it was on cask. I remember the rubbish that used to be canned and served on the airplanes. I think Green King owns them now? Anyway I thought it was fine from cask. Had a couple of Bombardiers on that trip too.

I don't want to take away from Realbeer.com but there is an active UK beer board here:

http://www.bottledbeer.co.uk/forum/default.asp

MeridianFC
04-14-2006, 02:16 PM
I try not to pop in here too often as it makes me very thirsty. And sad.

Send you care packages of cask ale to:

MeridianFC
Head hanging low with empty pint glass
Last bar stool
Wasington, DC
USA

Bloodaxe
04-27-2006, 03:13 AM
Move to England, meridian- I'm sure we still accept refugees and you can claim asylum- say that you faced the torture of being forced to drink Bud in your home country or something!

Richard English
04-27-2006, 07:03 AM
I was in The Victoria last night (near Paddington). As some of you know, it's a very nice Fuller's house and, for the first time, I saw an engine dispensing Gales HSB (Fullers have bought out Gales)..

As I was waiting to be served, an attractive young lady, accompanied by a gentleman whom I assume was her boyfriend, left the bar, carrying a glass of Gales HSB (4.8%). I said to her, "Is that really HSB you're drinking?" And she replied, "Certainly". So I congratulated her on her taste in choosing one of England's finest strong ales. At this her boyfriend said, "Oh yes. She has very fine taste in many things as well as beer!" Obviously he was commenting on her good taste in choosing him as a boyfriend.

Well, although I said nothing I silently disagreed since he was drinking - wait for it - Kronenburg 1664 - a chemical fizz of the standard of Dudweiser. Maybe she'll make a man of him eventually.

MeridianFC
04-27-2006, 10:56 AM
Originally posted by Richard English


Well, although I said nothing I silently disagreed since he was drinking - wait for it - Kronenburg 1664 - a chemical fizz of the standard of Dudweiser. Maybe she'll make a man of him eventually.

Well spoken sir.

Mr. Axe, I'd toyed with the idea of moving over to your patch, well actually a bit north of your patch, some time ago. As I'm am currently exploring the early days of fatherhood I'm afraid it will be quite impossible.

There's always retirement I suppose. Others upon reaching their golden years seek the heat and humidity of tropical climes, me I'm aiming for the warmth of a real fire and pints of Best.

Richard English
04-27-2006, 11:56 AM
Originally posted by MeridianFC
Well spoken sir.

Mr. Axe, I'd toyed with the idea of moving over to your patch, well actually a bit north of your patch, some time ago. A

You'd not be able to go very far north of South Shields and still be in England...

MeridianFC
04-27-2006, 01:53 PM
Originally posted by Richard English
You'd not be able to go very far north of South Shields and still be in England...

T'wasn't England I was referring to.

:D

Bloodaxe
04-28-2006, 02:14 PM
Originally posted by MeridianFC
T'wasn't England I was referring to.

:D
Presumably Bonnie Scotland then- the border's about 60 miles North from here. Good thing you didn't then! Until recently Scotland wasn't really that good for beer, I always assumed that's why the Scots preferred whisky!" There's not a great deal of real ale to be had in Scotland- there is Belhaven in Dunbar who produces some nice beers(taken over recently by Greene King) and The Houston Brewing Co. who are doing some good stuff. You'd have been better to have come here to Tyneside. Then you can go to York easily- 90 miles away to the South, and Durham City is only a few miles away, The Lake District and the rest of Cumbria to the West and Edinburgh 120 miles to the North, then you got the best of both worlds!

MeridianFC
04-28-2006, 02:41 PM
Actually Scotland has a small revolution going on, in several cases with English born brewers at the helm, Harviestoun being the most notable example. I will agree that this is a fairly recent change but there some stunning beer going on:

Caledonian (CBOB winner)
Orkney
Harviestoun (CBOB winner)
Belhaven
Cairngorm (MeridianFC DGA winner)
Islay Ales
Houston
Williams/Heather Ale
An Tealagh
Atlas
Broughton
Skye
Forth
Arran
Bridge of Allen
Clockwork
Inveralmond
Valhalla

Certainly can't compare to the breadth on offer in England, but you've got 12X the population and all of the hops!

I think there's only one way for you to make your case and that's for me to get myself up to your patch and have you drag me around by the pint glass till I'm battered into submission by force of ales.

BTW it's funny you mention Durham, I live in a city named for one it's most famous sons.

Richard English
04-28-2006, 02:43 PM
Quite so.

The Scottish beer scene is much better now than it was just a generation ago, but it is still relatively poor compared to England's.

Of the countries of the British Islands, England is far and away the best for good beer. Wales has always been reasonably good but Scotland lost its beer heritage back in the 1970s and is only now beginning to brew good beer again.

MeridianFC
04-28-2006, 02:46 PM
Can't argue that point.

England is a stunning country for beer. In spite of the protestations of some, I've never had trouble finding a good pint. Well there was a time in Milton Keynes some time back but I'd rather not think about it.

Bloodaxe
04-28-2006, 05:48 PM
Originally posted by MeridianFC
Actually Scotland has a small revolution going on, in several cases with English born brewers at the helm, Harviestoun being the most notable example. I will agree that this is a fairly recent change but there some stunning beer going on:

Caledonian (CBOB winner)
Orkney
Harviestoun (CBOB winner)
Belhaven
Cairngorm (MeridianFC DGA winner)
Islay Ales
Houston
Williams/Heather Ale
An Tealagh
Atlas
Broughton
Skye
Forth
Arran
Bridge of Allen
Clockwork
Inveralmond
Valhalla

Certainly can't compare to the breadth on offer in England, but you've got 12X the population and all of the hops!

I think there's only one way for you to make your case and that's for me to get myself up to your patch and have you drag me around by the pint glass till I'm battered into submission by force of ales.

BTW it's funny you mention Durham, I live in a city named for one it's most famous sons.
Well, yes, you're right! It has had a wee bit of a revolution! Actually I hadn't realised how much until you listed 'em! But!! I'll stand by my original claim- now happily outdated!- that until a few years ago, good beer was hard to find! And I've drank a lot of those beers you've listed too! Beer related amnesia, anyone?
Where do you live incidentally?- A son of Durham? I've been racking my brains for that one! The NE of England has produced a few notables from time to time.
You're always welcome in my neck of the woods! Just ask and I'll show you a few choice pubs with decent ale!

MeridianFC
05-01-2006, 10:05 AM
Actually my assertion is incorrect on a technicality. General George Washington's people were from Washington, Durham, ENG (he was actually born in the British colony of Virginia). Still his family is named for that place, my city is named for him (our "state" flag is the Washington family coat of arms).

http://www.washington.co.uk/history.htm

the bit up in the corner for reference.

I've often thought if I had some money opening a brother and sister set of pubs in both Washingtons would be the ticket.

chazwicke
05-01-2006, 10:58 AM
Originally posted by MeridianFC


There's always retirement I suppose. Others upon reaching their golden years seek the heat and humidity of tropical climes, me I'm aiming for the warmth of a real fire and pints of Best.

A worthy dream! I've often thought about this too.

Richard English
05-01-2006, 11:16 AM
Why do you think I moved? My new bungalow is right opposite The Partridge!

http://www.travelpublishing.co.uk/HiddenPlacesSussex/WestSussexWeald/sus17534.htm

MeridianFC
05-01-2006, 12:07 PM
A most commodius and welcoming establishment that appears.

Richard English
05-02-2006, 02:33 AM
And, as ever, all members of this board will be welcome to join me for a pint (or several)!

Bloodaxe
05-02-2006, 03:28 AM
Well, I'm only a few miles from Washington Old Hall- the family seat so to speak! (I was only joking that I couldn't think of any called Washington- um, remind me, who was he again?)
You know something though, though? I've never visited the place! Despite my interest in history it is a fact that you often neglect places on your doorstep, probably because in your average week you're too busy with workand family engagements to find enough time to have days out- I know my time is limited, and I try to utilise it to the fullest. I mean it's not if there isn't plenty around here. Hadrian's Wall stretches out over Northumberland and Cumbria, there's countless castles- Northumbria borders with Scotland after all!- and there's the remains of a Roman Fort here in South Shields.

chazwicke
05-02-2006, 09:24 AM
Washington comes from the original Scottish Wessynton. I grew up in a neighborhood that bordered Mt. Vernon and was built on property purchased from the Mt. Vernon Ladies Assn. Our Neighborhood was named Wessynton.

Bloodaxe
05-04-2006, 02:53 AM
Hi Chaz, you got me a bit puzzled there as Washington Old Hall is here in Durham, England, not in Scotland- unless Washington's family was from Scottish stock- I must admit to knowing very little here! The old Kingdom of Northumbria (over 1000 years ago)stretched from the Humber river in what now is Yorkshire to around Edinburgh in Scotland, before England and Scotland really existed as countries, so it wasn't as if the Scots ever controlled this bit! Although the borders were the focus of many clashes from major battles to sheep stealing and banditry!

MeridianFC
05-04-2006, 10:55 AM
I'd been thinking about this as it doesn't look a Scots or Gaelic name. According to the city site:


The Wessyngton, which had various spellings until it evolved into Washington, comes from the Anglo Saxon - 'Hwaes' a Saxon Chief, 'Inga' meaning family of, and 'Tun' an estate - the estate of Hwae's (Wassa's) family

It's interesting you bring up that bit about Northumbria as relates to the north of England and the south of Scotland. Many folks assume that the Enlgish are all Anlgo-Saxon and the Scots are all Celtic peoples, which is pretty far from the truth. There are Celtic parts of England and Germanic parts of Scotland (as well as Pict, Doric, Norman, etc. of each). Of couse nowadays it's goes even wider than that, but I suppose that's a topic for another day.

FWIW the Scottish side of my family were border rievers which probably explains how they ended up here and not remaining over there! Now gi' me yer sheep.

On the good news side for those of us trapped on this side of the Atlantic with more difficult access to cask beer, my local (the Reef famed in song and story....maybe I'd better write some songs and stories) is serving the Oakham JHB the night, which I find both tasty and refreshing. Here's hoping the firkin is in good nick.

Bloodaxe
05-04-2006, 11:29 AM
Well, Meridian, we're all bloody mongrels here! Especially me- Norwegian Dad, English Mam with Scots and German blood in there too!
There has always been Celts in England. There seems to be this idea that when the various invaders came-the Romans, Saxons, Vikings etc. came that they all buggered off to Scotland and Wales. Whereas some undoubtedly did, others would have stayed, made their peace with the invaders and eventually intermixed. I think DNA sampling usually proves that where-ever you come from within the UK you generally have a right old mixture!
Border reivers, Meridian- they were the lads! Spent most of the time crossing the borders - in both directions!-and creating a bit of hell! You can still see the fortified houses throughout Northumberland- "Bastles" as they are known.
Edit:- actually there hasn't always been Celts in Britain. The people who built Stonehenge, etc. weren't Celts but we don't know who they were, they left their monuments but no writings of any sort. The Celts came later over from the continent, presumably absorbing the original inhabitants. This country has has a lot of people tramping through it across the millennia!

MeridianFC
05-04-2006, 12:03 PM
Originally posted by Bloodaxe
This country has has a lot of people tramping through it across the millennia!

That must be why there are not straight roads over there, well other than the ones the Romans built. ;)

Bloodaxe
05-04-2006, 03:20 PM
And I love those bendy roads- fun in a hot rod or a truck! A particular favourite is the A696 through Alston, over Hartside to Penrith. Always stop off at the County Hotel or the Bluebell in Alston for a swift pint when I'm passing through!

Gordonstoun
05-31-2006, 12:31 PM
I well remember a late-night dash from Pilston to a pub somewhere in rural North Devon. Five of us, large lads all, crammed into a tiny car (smaller than a Cooper Mini), and drove at breakneck speed on a winding one-lane road hardly wider than that elfen car. Tall earthen hedgerows lined the road, and it was like driving through a tunnel. I didn't think I'd live to see that pub.

When we got there, a local playing darts heard me speak, and said, " 'Ey, where ya from, mate?"

"Kentucky", I replied.

It turned out that his favorite drink was Southern Comfort, and he was so happy to meet someone from Kentucky, that he offered to buy me a beer.

"I'll try one o' them Whitbread's Bitter Ales"

Now, to you CAMRA types, Whitbreads may be nothing special, but to someone who had never tasted anything more exotic than Molson, it was a revelation. I'd never known what hops tasted like, until then. It was delightful, and my love affair with British ales began that night.

I didn't have the heart to tell my benefactor that "Southern Comfort" was the PBR of bourbons.

Richard English
05-31-2006, 12:44 PM
Originally posted by MeridianFC
That must be why there are not straight roads over there, well other than the ones the Romans built. ;)
In fact, the rolling English road, in spite of Chesterton's poem - http://www.chesterton.org/gkc/poet/englishroad.htm - was not made by the rolling English drunkard.

Our strangely convoluted roads are a reult of the enclosure Acts which meant that roads then had to go around the boundaries of the newly enclosed fields, rather than straight across, which would be most normal travellers' inclination. In most other countries roads take the most direct route unless physical obstructions, such as hills or rivers, force a detour.

Of course, as has been mentioned, we do have some wonderful beers, which will surely have created a few rolling drunkards over the years.

MeridianFC
05-31-2006, 02:08 PM
Originally posted by Richard English


Of course, as has been mentioned, we do have some wonderful beers, which will surely have created a few rolling drunkards over the years.

I refuse to comment on the grounds I may incriminate myself (do I have that right in Britain?) ;)

O2 Mash
07-12-2006, 03:21 PM
Sho is!