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Stefan A
06-20-2006, 12:35 AM
I just put a 30L keg of Franziskaner hefe in the kegerator. Can someone recommend temperature and co2 pressure for this?

Thanks,
Stefan

HarkJohnny
06-20-2006, 12:54 PM
prob around 8-10psi for a 4-5ft length of beer line and fridge around 40ish

not entirely sure but that's one delish beer! been enjoying my 12pk since the weekend.

MeridianFC
06-20-2006, 01:14 PM
Double check that psi, most hefes require heftier (15-20 psi) pressure.

HogieWan
06-20-2006, 01:29 PM
I'd agree that the hefe should have a lot of carbonation - that's a wonderful beer you have on your hands

steveh
06-20-2006, 04:07 PM
Hmm, anyone know if they condition the kegs? I've had it on tap before and it's as cloudy as Hacker-Pschorr from the keg.

S.

Stefan A
06-20-2006, 06:49 PM
I'd agree that the hefe should have a lot of carbonation - that's a wonderful beer you have on your hands

I'd rather have it in my stomach :)

Thanks for the replies, I will try a higher setting. I also had heard that it should be set higher than usual, but the guy at the store where I got the keg said not to change anything. I wasn't going to argue, but I didn't think he was right.

Stefan

HogieWan
06-20-2006, 07:26 PM
One problem - you up your pressure without any other changes, and the beer will come out very fast. A fast poured hefe will leave more foam than you would like to imagine

Stefan A
06-20-2006, 09:02 PM
OK - so what sort of changes do I need to make?

Stefan

HogieWan
06-21-2006, 09:32 AM
Originally posted by Stefan A
OK - so what sort of changes do I need to make?

Stefan

you need more restriction in your beer line - i.e. a longer line or a more narrow line.

Stefan A
06-21-2006, 10:33 AM
Forgive me for being dense - or too inquisitive :). But could you give me an idea of exactly what would be the proper size beer line? Currently, my beer line is 4.5-5 feet in length and the inner diameter is 3/16"

Thanks,
Stefan

HogieWan
06-21-2006, 11:27 AM
I don't know all the specifics, but search for balancing tap lines or similar. All I know is that a certain line (material, width, and height diff) has a certain restriction. To get good flow, you're keg pressure needs to match your resitriction. However, a certain pressure at a certain tempeture gives a certain amount of carbonation. So you need to balance out all these things

What I'm saying is that, while the Hefe might be a bit better with higher carbonation, it may not be worth all the trouble.

I'm hoping someone with more knowledge on the subject could chime in here.

corkybstewart
06-21-2006, 11:50 AM
I use 3/16 ID line, 5' long at 14psi for my beers, including my hefe-which I'm sure is nowhere near as good as what you have. I did drink a bottle of Franzikaner last night, damn it ws good.

But I'd bet the beer is already carbonated in the keg, all you're doing is pushing it out. I wouldn't change your settings at all or you'll be drinking foam forever.

HogieWan
06-21-2006, 12:37 PM
Originally posted by corkybstewart

But I'd bet the beer is already carbonated in the keg, all you're doing is pushing it out. I wouldn't change your settings at all or you'll be drinking foam forever.

Yes, it is carbed, but as you push the beer out, you replace the liquid volume with co2. If you put too little, the headspace will "absorb" co2 from the beer as equilibrium is reached. Unless you drink the whole keg in one day, the carbonation will change.

corkybstewart
06-21-2006, 12:47 PM
I don't think so Hogie, otherwise every keg you tapped would have the same problem. You'ld have to kep bumping up the presure to maintain the same level of carbonation. I never change my settings and unless I do something stupid(like last weekend) my kegs maintain pretty much the same level of carbonation from start to finish.

HogieWan
06-21-2006, 12:51 PM
If a given keg had 2 volumes of co2 in solution, and you were only adding 1 volume as you pushed the beer out, how would the co2 stay in solution?

corkybstewart
06-21-2006, 12:57 PM
There you go getting all scientific on me. You got me.

MeridianFC
06-21-2006, 01:35 PM
I'm not scientist, but I do know what I've been told, you have to maintain on your regulator whatever level the beer is carbonated at. Some beers, Brooklyn for instance, actually have it printed on the keg collar (an astounding 18 psi for Brooklyn Pilsner).

corkybstewart
06-21-2006, 01:42 PM
You guys have to keep in mind I haven't bought a keg since I was in college, before lots of y'all were born. I only use my homebrew, and I carbonate all of them at the same pressure, but somehow my hefe's come out more carbonated than say my stout.

HogieWan
06-21-2006, 02:17 PM
Originally posted by corkybstewart
I carbonate all of them at the same pressure, but somehow my hefe's come out more carbonated than say my stout.

IF they are all at the same pressure and tempeture, they will have the same level of carbonation. One may hide that more than the other, though

corkybstewart
06-21-2006, 03:50 PM
Different beers retain their head better, that's probaby what I'm seeing.

MeridianFC
06-21-2006, 04:12 PM
Head retention can be an issue related to a lot things (protein, etc.). Wheat is used in some brews specifically for its head retention characteristics.