Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: home brew catastrophe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    369

    home brew catastrophe

    Through my own impatience, and incompetence, I have ruined some of my wife's decorations with a six foot geyser of homebrew. ( I did not follow my Tap-a-draft instructions). Boy, I feel just like Fred Flintstone, or Ralph Kramden trying to clean it up and make things right before the boss gets home.

    On the plus side I thought this would make a good thread topic. How about it, any Home brew or beer related blunders out there? (Other than being cross eyed and painless), which also makes a good story sometimes.
    Last edited by M.K. Jeeves; 03-20-2009 at 08:50 AM.
    Being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned.
    Samuel Johnson

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    456
    ok as a fellow owner of a tapadraft setup.......... what did you do exactly
    Michael M

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    369
    I was changing the tap to a new keg. The new keg was at room temp and may have been over primed.
    Being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned.
    Samuel Johnson

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by M.K. Jeeves
    Through my own impatience, and incompetence, I have ruined some of my wife's decorations , with a six foot geyser of homebrew. ( I did not follow my Tap-a-draft instructions). Boy, I feel just like Fred Flintstone, or Ralph Kramden trying to clean it up and make things right before the boss gets home.

    On the plus side I thought this would make a good thread topic. How about it, any Home brew or beer related blunders out there? (Other than being cross eyed and painless), which also makes a good story sometimes.
    First time I converted my keggerator to use corny kegs and tried force carbonating, it was a huge mess. I failed to realize just how much pressure 25 psi really is and I didn't secure the lines with hose clamps at all points. The beer worked ok, but the second keg, rootbeer I was making for my kids, didn't - a line blew at a splice and spewed sticky, smelly rootbeer all over everything before I could regain control. It jumped up in the air and waggled around, like a snake from a snake charmer's basket, making sure everything in the dining room was good and covered by rootbeer. It was like a scene from a movie - and in slow motion too.

    I hose-clamped the life out of everything after that.
    Owl looked at Rabbit and wondered whether to push him off the tree, but feeling that he could always do it afterward, he tried once more to find out what they were talking about.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    239
    Quote Originally Posted by M.K. Jeeves
    I have ruined some of my wife's decorations
    She is going to buy more of that crap anyway. Your beer however was the real loss.

    One time when I cleaned my kegerators lines whilst drunk, I tapped the keg before replacing the faucet.
    As a matter of fact, I do have a good reason for smelling like a brewery.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,445
    For one of my first brews I figured if the instructions called for 1 can of extract and 2 pounds of table sugar, 3 or 4 pounds of sugar should really boost the alkie potential, right?
    So I'm sitting at a meeting in Oklahoma City with a client and my pager goes off. As soon as I can, I call the little woman and get a torrent of filth you wouldn't believe. It seems when she got home from work the airlock had blown off and there was krausen flowing across the bar, down the cabinet doors and onto the carpet.
    So I tell her to grab a hose from the garage and try to divert the flow into a bucket-my first(her last) blowoff hose.
    I have had a series of non-brewing mishaps that required major household cleanups and are worthy of Hollywood movies, but no one would ever believe them. Of course they all do involve alcohol.
    Last edited by corkybstewart; 03-18-2009 at 08:31 PM.
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Oatmeal Stout, ESB
    Primary:Imperial HoppyRoggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Sticke Alt

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    184
    Was in New Zealand helping out at a creft brewery.

    was going to clean an empty tank and still had to remove the rresidual yeast. the tank was still under pressure and aas I was opening the valve I thought to my self " hey now something is not quite right here" and thus a bullet of yeast ferrociously hit me in the leg spreading yeast all over my leg and incidently the explosion of yeast after contact with my leg disppersed enough energy that I even got some in the face!


    I let out the remaining pressure before I opened the valve again and walked around all day wearing some microbes.
    Barley is not grown for donkeys.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,101
    Very early in my brewing career, I had a batch get contaminated. The wild yeast or bacteria continued working in the bottles.
    About 2 weeks after bottling, my wife wakes up to the sound of glass breaking, and is convinced someone is breaking into the house.
    After retrieving my handgun, and searching the house, I finally figured out (when the next bottle broke) that it was my now beer hand grenades.

    I took the 2 cases and put them in the tub until morning.
    -Beerking
    "Asking whether computers can think is like asking if submarines can swim."

    Inventor of the Rauch HellerBock style of beer!
    GABF 2008 Pro Am Silver medal! (Rauch HellerBock)
    1st place Smoked/Wood Aged Beer - 2008 Longshot NE Region

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    169
    Couple of years ago, I had a BarleyWine that I racked onto the yeast cake from a PaleAle, fermentation TOOK OFF like you wouldnt believe. That night when the wife and I were getting ready for bed, I hear a loud noise and think somebody is trying to break in... after several tense momments clearing the house, it finally dawns on me what caused the noise. The air lock had gotten clogged up with hops until it built up pressure to the point that it blew the cap & airlock off the carboy, which then ricoched around in the pantry room under the stairwell. I go in and it looks like a scene from "TubGirl", a hop-trub geyser was spraying the ceiling and walls. I had to move the carboy to the shower and put on a blowoff tube, then spent the next hour cleaning... Good Times.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    253
    My favorite is the story of the guy who returned home from being out of town for a few days and was like, who took my carboy? On closer inspection he sees shattered bits of glass. Turns out the entire carboy had exploded. Imagine the sound of that one!
    I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy (TOM WAITS)

    Fermenter/Priming: Van the Man Irish Red Ale
    On tap: Pisgah Pale Ale clone, American Wheat Ale

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    317
    Quote Originally Posted by corkybstewart View Post
    For one of my first brews I figured if the instructions called for 1 can of extract and 2 pounds of table sugar, 3 or 4 pounds of sugar should really boost the alkie potential, right?
    So I'm sitting at a meeting in Oklahoma City with a client and my pager goes off. As soon as I can, I call the little woman and get a torrent of filth you wouldn't believe. It seems when she got home from work the airlock had blown off and there was krausen flowing across the bar, down the cabinet doors and onto the carpet.
    So I tell her to grab a hose from the garage and try to divert the flow into a bucket-my first(her last) blowoff hose.
    I have had a series of non-brewing mishaps that required major household cleanups and are worthy of Hollywood movies, but no one would ever believe them. Of course they all do involve alcohol.
    Yep, that's how I discovered the blow-off hose, too. (In fact, I learned after coming to you guys for help!!)

    Another notable disaster I had once was on the kegging side. To make a super long, boring story short, I was new to kegging, and had a full Cornelius keg sitting out in the garage all night to cool down. (It was winter, and I didn't have my chest freezer yet.) I had done the quick "shaking the keg at 30 psi for 30 minutes" method of carbonating, and had let it sit at that pressure all night. I went to check on it in the morning, and intended to pour a small amount into a glass using a picnic tap.

    I made three costly errors:

    1. Didn't reduce/bleed the pressure!!

    2. Didn't check that the picnic tap was closed before attaching the other end to the keg!!

    Well, it was open, and the tap left my hand immediately, shooting beer around all over the garage, and it took me a good 10-15 seconds to get a grip on it again and shut it off!! It was like watching The Three Stooges operate a fire hose. (A fire hose shooting beer, in my garage.)

    3. The third error was situating this whole thing right next to both a 350 Chevy and a Ford 4.6L block I had on stands in various states of dis-assembly simultaneously, along with the hundreds of other parts, and tools commonly found strewn about a gearhead's garage. That was not fun to clean up!!

    Anyway, I'm much more careful now!!
    Last edited by Botoole560; 09-30-2014 at 02:03 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •