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Thread: 1930 German brewery video

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by beerking
    Same concept, similiar results, but very different mechanical implementation.
    Okay, got it. It was the concept I was after.

    Still... what the heck is the Kuhlschiffe really for? Do you suppose any leftover hop residue sticks to the tabletop as the wort flows down toward the cooler?

    S.
    Life is too short to drink bad beer.

  2. #17
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    I just found the bit I was looking for about Anchor, though I didn't have it exactly right:

    http://www.beerhunter.com/documents/19133-001513.html

    Brewers there used lager yeasts, but fermented at warm temperatures as if they were making ale. They employed distinctively wide, shallow, fermenting vessels much the same as Continental brewers' cool ships to bring down the temperature.
    "It happened to me that I drank one beer after another."
    -Hasek

  3. #18
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    Interesting to note that the 1930s brewery also employs the open fermenters.

    Stan says this is still common practice in many of the smaller German breweries, especially in Bamberg.

    S.
    Life is too short to drink bad beer.

  4. #19
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    When Cap City first opened here (1992) they used one open fermenter, very much like the old Pilsner Urquell style.
    "It happened to me that I drank one beer after another."
    -Hasek

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by steveh
    Interesting to note that the 1930s brewery also employs the open fermenters.
    In recent research I've been doing on some NY/NJ metro area breweries I was surprised at how often I came across open fermenters in the post-Repeal era in the US (I guess Prohibition in the US is just an easy dividing line between "antique-modern" but it doesn't always work like that).

    Here's a shot of Schaefer in Brooklyn (click on photo) during a visit by West German brewers in 1954. (I just love the guy with a handful of foam, and the other guy examining it.)

    One of Ballantine's huge fermenters, as a worker skims off the ale circa 1937.

    And Ballantine's next door neighbor, Feigenspan, in the same era. Those are 400 barrel ale fermenters on the left, on the right are 100 barrel wooden casks of Feigenspan's IPA, which they aged for "two years or more"- twice the aging of Ballantine's better known IPA and their long gone Brown Stout.

    The only open fermenters I've seen are Ommegang's (but you can only look at them in the clean room through a window) but it seems like we've recently seen internet video of Sierra Nevada's, too, right?
    Last edited by jesskidden; 03-30-2009 at 05:49 PM.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesskidden

    One of Ballantine's huge fermenters, as a worker skims off the ale circa 1937.
    Looks like he's got a long way
    to go
    And for those of you who really don't like beer, there's AB, Coors and MillerSAB products.

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by corysdad
    Looks like he's got a long way
    to go
    Yeah, well, normally he'd have a cheroot in his mouth but the bosses told him when the photographer from Fortune Magazine showed up, he had to take it out. Threw off his rhythm. (No way he was gonna take off the hat, tho').

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesskidden
    (I just love the guy with a handful of foam, and the other guy examining it.)
    Yeah, and I'm sure the brewmaster is thinking, "Well -- there's a batch shot to hell!" Yike.

    One of Ballantine's huge fermenters, as a worker skims off the ale circa 1937.
    Is that all that's going on there? It looks like those two pipes to the left of the skimmer are flowing freely. And what's the need of skimming?

    but it seems like we've recently seen internet video of Sierra Nevada's, too, right?
    Was that from open fermenters or just footage shot through a port?

    Nope, I'd say that's open: http://www.sierranevada.com/tour/fermentation.html

    S.
    Life is too short to drink bad beer.

  9. #24
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    Note that the beer being skimmed is an ale. Ale yeasts work at the top of the liquid, and many ale yeasts are known as "top croppers." That is, the yeast is cropped (harvested for use in the next batch) from the top of the fermenter.
    There is a traditional British fermenter design, known as the "Burton Union" in which the fermenter is designed such that pipes capture the top yeast as the beer expands during fermentation.
    Marston's is the only brewery still using a Burton Union system.
    http://www.beerhunter.com/documents/19133-000132.html
    -Beerking
    "Asking whether computers can think is like asking if submarines can swim."

    Inventor of the Rauch HellerBock style of beer!
    GABF 2008 Pro Am Silver medal! (Rauch HellerBock)
    1st place Smoked/Wood Aged Beer - 2008 Longshot NE Region

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by beerking
    (harvested for use in the next batch)
    So they don't just wait for it to finish, settle out, then harvest and re-generate it? Interesting -- seems like they're taking more chance at contamination by mucking around with it this way, but I guess they've got history on their side.

    S.
    Life is too short to drink bad beer.

  11. #26
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    For many strains of ale yeast, the strongest, and preferrable cells are those that float to the top. Top cropping is a way to select only those cells, thus leaving out weaker mutations and potential infection strains.
    -Beerking
    "Asking whether computers can think is like asking if submarines can swim."

    Inventor of the Rauch HellerBock style of beer!
    GABF 2008 Pro Am Silver medal! (Rauch HellerBock)
    1st place Smoked/Wood Aged Beer - 2008 Longshot NE Region

  12. #27
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    Thanks King!! Cool video!!

    I liked seeing just how modern this facility looked, even in 1930. Many of the components looked similar to what we have today, they just didn't move nearly as quickly, and many still required human operation, whereas these days, things are more automated. I especially liked the cask preparation portion, where they are rolling down those rails, then they guy puts what looked like a cleaning wand inside, and another guy looked like he was giving the keg a quick dip in some type of sanitizer, with the help of a pneumatic lift. (I didn't have the audio on, I'm at work at the moment, but I'll surely watch it again at home with the sound on.)

    Thanks again!!

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