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Thread: organic Breweries

  1. #16
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    Yep

    When people try to bombard me with "organic" I always remind them that poison ivy is also organic.

  2. #17
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    bigmf, i agree that taste is what matters most, but there is something to be said for voting with your dollar for things you care about, and some people care about using natural processes with natural things.

    The funny thing for me is that regarding beer i somehow feel like organic beer must be inferior. i generally avoid it when i see it in stores-- i guess because there isnt much of it in varieties im interested in trying, although i did have an organic caledonian beer i liked (i bought it b/c i love caledonian beer and its the only one i can find in the US).

    I think its a noble pursuit to create a beer where none of the ingredients have ever come into contact with chemicals, but im much more interested in things like organic meat or vegetables where the fact that no hormones, antibiotics or chemical fertilizers were used actually could have some impact on my health.

    i dont really see the benefit to organic beer when most of what i drink is already made only from water, barley, yeast and hops. i dont really care if pesticides or something was used to keep the crop healthy as long as it turns into good beer. but for some reason if i were to eat barley plain i would maybe feel organic barley was better. its just a weird perception thing for me that when the ingredients get turned into beer i am less interested than if consuming the ingredients on their own. The organic label doesnt make me feel any better about a beer for some reason.

  3. #18
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    Aug 2003
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    I guess what I was saying is that the term organic is so misused and underdefined as to be meaningless. Hops, barley and yeast are organic in the widely accepted definition of the word. The term "organic food" means something else. If my barley was malted with untreated water, or the beer brewed with untreated water I might get pretty nervous about drinking it.

    Anyway no more ranting for me.

    M.

  4. #19
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    Rants are good. Thats one of the reasons for this board. Some of our best threads derive from rants. Take a look at the smoking thread.

  5. #20
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    Dec 2002
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    Originally posted by studentofbeer
    I think its a noble pursuit to create a beer where none of the ingredients have ever come into contact with chemicals, but im much more interested in things like organic meat or vegetables where the fact that no hormones, antibiotics or chemical fertilizers were used actually could have some impact on my health.

    i dont really see the benefit to organic beer when most of what i drink is already made only from water, barley, yeast and hops. i dont really care if pesticides or something was used to keep the crop healthy as long as it turns into good beer.
    Just playing devil's advocate here - not trying to tear anyone down. You don't want hormones, antibiotics or chemical fertilizers in your meat and veggies, but pesticides are OK in your beer?! Also, ever consider chemical fertilizers that might be used to grow that barley and hops? And the chemicals that then leech into the groundwater?

    I don't advocate either, organic or non. I simply advocate good beer. And don't discount a beer because of the "organic" label. It just might turn out to be a new favorite.

    Cheers!

  6. #21
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    Feb 2003
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    many times (not all) the problem with organice fruits, vegetables and grains is that they are not as fresh. The either have some insect wear and tear or some other thing wrong with them. This has also been my experience with organic beer supllies. I many times find them to be of lesser quality than their non organic counter part. I also live in a hippy Mecca so I would expect that there would be the best of the best organic stuff here. There definately is a ton of it.

  7. #22
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    Organic produce doesn't have the chemicals added to the soil to help it grow, nor does it have any preservatives to keep it fresh. I'm pretty sure that's the basic definition.

    This means that you're going to get a slightly smaller yield from your crop, and it's not going to last as long. There are those who believe that this is a GOOD thing, and I can't really say I disagree, but I don't go crazy looking for it in the stores. I CAN say that the juice I make with organic fruits and veggies tastes much better than the standard stuff. I hope the same is true with beer... maybe I oughta get some of the Sam Smith's stuff I've been seeing (one lager, one ale) and give it a whirl!
    So many beers, so little time off...

    www.michaelolsononline.com - Drop in and say hi! WAY better than the old one.

  8. #23
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    i think my problem with organic in terms of beer is marketing. i feel like calling it organic in big labels at least gives the impression that the organic quality of the beer is more important than the style, what it tastes like, etc.

    i would be more interested to see a brewer take one of their normal lines and turn it organic rather than produce a beer whose only quality seems to be its organic ingredients and not its flavor.

    Maybe this is hard to do though, because as someone mentioned its difficult to grow hops organically? or more likely it doesnt make sense to them to sell an organic version of something with a slightly higher price than the standard version? still, brewing a "regular" and "organic" version of the same brew would at least give consumers the choice if there is a market for organic beer at all.

  9. #24
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    I would be interested in seeing a side by side comparison of the same beer brewed with organic and usual ingredients. Just to see if there was any difference in flavor.

  10. #25
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    The term "organic " also has social and enviromental responsibility aspects that are often ignored.
    Shipping an organic item around the world uses more energy to grow, package and transport the item than the energy that the food puts back into the energy cycle.

    There are more aspects but this is one that is often ignored.

    So technically in Canada we can never consume an organic banana, because bananas are not produced locally.

    The same follows for beer. It is best to buy beer produced locally because you are not consuming fossil fuels to get the beer into your hands.

    Out of all the terrible things we do to the enviroment, the one change we can make, that would vastly improve the world, at least enviromentally, is in our diet. Beer is a small part of this, for some anyway, but every bit counts.

  11. #26
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    Jan 2004
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    A source of well crafted beers that are brewed with organic ingredients can be found here:
    http://www.fishbrewing.com/

    Their Fish Tale Ales are quite good.

    I also know that many Alaskan brewers strive for organic, such as Homer Brewing Company, Homer, Alaska
    Great Bear Brewing, Wasilla, Alaska
    Sleeping Lady Brewery, Anchorage, Alaska

    Maybe not all, but certainly some if not most...

  12. #27
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    Mar 2005
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    Originally posted by threecb
    Wolavers (sp?) in VT is an organic brewery.
    They're now housed with Otter Creek...

    I had the Pale Ale over the summer. It wasn't bad...
    their Oatmeal Stout is the very best stout I have ever tried(I've tried a lot)!

  13. #28
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    Apr 2003
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    I agree with you on the Oaty Stout. It's the best of their line. I've heard the Wit was decent, too.
    "Martinis are for squares, man."

  14. #29
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    I've seen the Wolaver's line but have not tried them. Maybe I should. I once visited Otter Creek but that was many moons ago. I always liked the Long Trail Ale best from Vermont.

  15. #30
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    Dec 2007
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    Mountain Goat Brewery

    Mountain Goat Brewing puts out some darn fine tasting beers.
    I enjoyed their IPA not too long ago.
    ...mmmmm... beer.....

    Beer Guide Australia
    www.beerguide.com.au

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