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Thread: organic Breweries

  1. #31
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    Mar 2003
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    635
    North Coast has an organic Trippel. Found it at Whole Foods. I thought it was very good.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    596
    Originally posted by evilredlight
    This is the sort of response I expected

    I assume organic breweries are trying to appeal to the lowest common denominator, not make a good beer.
    Lowest common denominator?? I know what it means but explains what YOU meant by that. I am neither an advocate of organic products or non-organically produced, but last time I checked, pilsneresque lagers like AB and Miller were marketed and are appealing to the lowest common denominator of highschoolers, frat boys and the like...
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  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    79
    There's a place in SF that does organic beers. The brewery is Thirsty Bear. I have only had their beers at the actual brewery, so I'm not sure how much they distribute. But if you are in town I recommend checking them out.
    Starting a brewery in the Bay Area.

    www.510brewing.com

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    897

    My two bits:

    My first bit:

    My father invests in an organic farm so I have some knowledge of what it means to be organic. They can use fertilizers but they have to be based on something thats natural like Kelp or compost. The same goes for incecticides but most prefer to drop praying matise eggs since they work all season long. Organic farmers tend to have less middle men between them and the consumer. This means the farmer can get more money per yeild and we shouldn't see a difference in price.

    My grandfather, not an organic farmer, couldn't spray any chemical on a patch and the plants were much bushier and healthy looking. He also started using half of the chemical he normally used. Besides saving money, wildlife started visiting again. Note that birds can eat a lot of insects.

    The second bit:

    I question how much better oraganic beers would be in the taste department. There is a lot of processing going on before you can pour your beer. Any homebrewer on the board watch it happen everytime a new batch is made. I would buy organic because of the ecological benefits of organic farming, not because of the beer itself.
    a post by Mad Scientist:
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  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    14
    I had the opportunity last spring to have an Organic Amber Ale at the Eel River Brewery in Fortuna CA.
    They state they are America's First Certified Organic Brewery.
    Very delicious brew with earthy tones and ample hops flavor for my palate.

    Too bad I can't get this brew in the Great Lakes state.
    Noob & Mr. Beer Enthusiast

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    184
    Quote Originally Posted by evilredlight
    This is the sort of response I expected

    I assume organic breweries are trying to appeal to the lowest common denominator, not make a good beer.
    currently Organic can not obtain the flavour profile that other malts have. I like the idea of Organic beer and am open to trying them but it is easy to be fooled by the name if you are trying a organic beer it might only be the malt that is organic and have little to do with the hops or other non-organic practises that are used in the brewery.
    Barley is not grown for donkeys.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    184
    on another note my homebrewing mentor gets all of his meat from a organic farmer and I have probably had the best feast's I could ever imagine.
    Barley is not grown for donkeys.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    2,838
    Quote Originally Posted by East Coaster
    currently Organic can not obtain the flavour profile that other malts have. I like the idea of Organic beer and am open to trying them but it is easy to be fooled by the name if you are trying a organic beer it might only be the malt that is organic and have little to do with the hops or other non-organic practises that are used in the brewery.
    Bingo. Ask your favorite organic brewery if they use 100% organic ingredients. Willing to bet they do not. Some may try, but still must supplement with non-organic ingredients at times - esp. hops. Others openly support regulations that would allow them to always use non-organic materials, which to me goes completely against what most of them preach on their websites/beer labels/etc.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    31
    Here in Florida we have the Orlando Brewery, some kind of certified Organic brewery. I can't say all their beer is bad, but I don't really think much of it as good either. They seem to be trying to cater to a certain crowd down here, and like i've read throughout this thread, they seem to be more concerned about its organic label than the flavor on my tongue.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    19
    i run an organic brewery in liverpool england (14bbl)and our beers, just like the marble organic in manchester are made to the highest standard.
    admittedly some of our hops are globally sourced because of the limited amount of organic hop growers around, however the majority of ingredients are from within a hundred mile radius of my brewplant.

    as for lowest common denominator? utter pish man. we leave that to the likes of coors miller dudweasel carlsberg and carling

    were only a few months old and were up for awards already so id say the quality is not an issue........

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by East Coaster
    currently Organic can not obtain the flavour profile that other malts have. I like the idea of Organic beer and am open to trying them but it is easy to be fooled by the name if you are trying a organic beer it might only be the malt that is organic and have little to do with the hops or other non-organic practises that are used in the brewery.
    i cannot agree with this i contract brew for a local inorganic brewery, the quality of our six row grain is superior to the cheap two row bollix he insists we use....

    he uses a lot of chemical adjuncts that ive done away with and ive had good reports off the new beer.

    95% of the ingredients need to be organic to get an organic certification.
    we filter our water through charcoal(yes organicly sourced) our yeast has an organic certification and the only compromise is in a few kg of hops in a few brews.......

  12. #42
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    17,536
    Critch, Will you be represented at GBBF? I'm so looking forward to it. It's been a few years since I last was able to get there.
    Dance to the music

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    39
    I could care less whether a beer is organic or not, but while on vacation in Scotland last month I had the chance to visit Black Isle brewery, which I believe is entirely organic, and was thoroughly impressed. They don't export to the States yet but said they'll be expanding with plans to do so soon. If you're really bored, you can read my long-winded post about my visit to Black Isle (as well as Cairngorm, another awesome Scottish brewery) here.
    I've got a 'lectric guitar and half a bottle of warm beer...

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    7,349
    Every organic beer I have tried from the US has the same off-flavor that I can't get past. I haven't ad any in a while but I remember them all being the same. I have had St Peter's and Sam Smith's lager that were organic, but they tasted like any other brew from the respective brewery.

    Anyone else find this from the US organics?
    My posts are definitive. Reality is frequently inaccurate.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    580
    Quote Originally Posted by HogieWan
    Every organic beer I have tried from the US has the same off-flavor that I can't get past. I haven't ad any in a while but I remember them all being the same. I have had St Peter's and Sam Smith's lager that were organic, but they tasted like any other brew from the respective brewery.

    Anyone else find this from the US organics?
    Have not tried that many but as mentioned about Eel River makes some pretty good organic brews. Never noticed on off flavor.

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