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Thread: St Pauli Girl revisited

  1. #1
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    St Pauli Girl revisited

    The other day after last tasting perhaps years ago I popped her once again and was very pleasantly surprised as she proved much sweeter than I remembered, a quality I cherish in a lager. Has she actually changed--didn't she used to be much drier--or is it me, not quite so fussy in my dotage

  2. #2
    Your palate has changed.
    All of the American Style Lagers (light, standard, and premium) are quite mildly bittered and finish sweet compared to what you have gotten used to.
    -B'Dawg

    Give a man a beer and he'll waste an hour. Teach him to brew and he'll waste a lifetime. - Nuco Gordo

  3. #3
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    St Pauli is one of my most want-to-like beers... never seems to live up to the expectation though... but I keep going back every few years.

  4. #4
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    Pow thank you for that report. Specifically how did it not live up

  5. #5
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    Can't specifically recall... most likely green bottle syndrome... suppose I'll have to try again... maybe this time things will be different

  6. #6
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    As with my post elsewhere here of cheap American beers changing thier formualtion, I can 100% garuntee you that its the same for German Lagers, despite the Rehiensgebodt( sorry spelling).
    There was a big marketing campaign way back when about "skunky" beer from Germany. Waht the marketing asshoes failed to say was that the 'skunk' flavor was cause it came from Germany, and the beer was so full bodied and hopped that it naturally develped a skunk flavor..who gives a crud? Id rather drink a million 'skunky' German beers than one cheap swill beer.
    Whatever, cause I've recently tried all the German lagers , and none of them tasse like they used to ( nor the Mexican beers that used to also taste like german Lagers).
    The formulaes have ALL been changed ( read, "cheapened"), they taste pretty much bland and watery now like everything else.
    The days of the best beer are gone.. what reamians may be good, but it aint the same.maybe you can get some more great beer at the Microbereweries.
    Last edited by jerryjg; 04-11-2010 at 08:32 PM.
    I WAS INTOXICATED BY HER CHARM..OR JUST PLAIN INTOXICATED, NOT SURE. Isuppose I should have remebered her name. I think it was jill, or jane..or Jan. Im pretty sure she had brown hair, or blonde. I went for coffee and she was gone when I got back.The desk clerk said she drove away in red Volvo IIRC.

  7. #7
    The green bottles (as well as clear) allow UV light to pass through. The UV light hits the hop resins and break them off forming a mercaptan, which also happens to be the chemical that skunks spray.

    It has NOTHING to do with them being "full-bodied and hopped". Even Bud will skunk when left in the light.

    Miller does not skunk because they have been able to distill that particular hop resin out of their hop extract, so that the clear bottles do not skunk.

    Here are two things for you to try:
    1) do a side-by-side of Heiniken in a can compared to a green bottle that you buy right off the shelf. Guaranteed that the can will taste much better.
    2) take a beer from a brown bottle, and split it into 2 glasses. drape a napkin over one to protect it from the sunlight. Leave the other in direct sunlight. Let them sit for 15 minutes, then smell and taste them both. It really does happen that quickly.

    HTH-
    Last edited by BrewDog; 04-11-2010 at 11:19 PM.
    -B'Dawg

    Give a man a beer and he'll waste an hour. Teach him to brew and he'll waste a lifetime. - Nuco Gordo

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrewDog

    Miller does not skunk because they have been able to distill that particular hop resin out of their hop extract, so that the clear bottles do not skunk.
    HTH-

    I never knew this.
    Drank lots of Miller in the past and never came across one that was skunky.

    Now I know why.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrewDog
    Miller does not skunk...
    I always assumed it was because the didn't use real hops. lol Seriously that's what I thougt.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikegobrew
    I always assumed it was because the didn't use real hops. lol Seriously that's what I thougt.
    C'mon, everybody knows Miller is TRIPLE-HOP BREWED!
    I suffer from Cenosillicaphobia- the fear of an empty glass!

  11. #11
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    It's not entirely beyond the realm of probability to suggest the reason they keep using green bottles is that some if not most of us actually like the fraction contributed by mercaptan. Thus in much the same way "land reclamation" has replaced "garbage dump" and "choice," for "abortion" might "musky" be substituted for "skunky"

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrewDog
    Your palate has changed.
    All of the American Style Lagers (light, standard, and premium) are quite mildly bittered and finish sweet compared to what you have gotten used to.
    Dog I take exception perhaps because I misunderstand. While I agree my palate might have drifted over the years, their "lightness" notwithstanding, the one overriding character of American-continent brews is their dryness

    One of the reasons for the apparent confusion is that very few connoisseurs of The Brew will admit they like the sweeter Euro-style lagers is the effeminate sound of the adjective "sweet" while "dry" has a sort of masculine ring

    Tus few if any of us will admit he likes it "sweet" but instead uses a term like "robust", also more manlike
    Last edited by dalehileman; 04-12-2010 at 03:23 PM.

  13. #13
    Ah, you are right, the American lagers are quite dry. But the low bitterness levels still aren't enough to balance the malt, leaving the perception of sweetness. It's an expectation thing. We get used to more bitterness in beer. Once that bitterness is missing, everything tastes "sweet".

    Hope this clears up what I meant.
    -B'Dawg

    Give a man a beer and he'll waste an hour. Teach him to brew and he'll waste a lifetime. - Nuco Gordo

  14. #14
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    Mar 2006
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    I disagree with all of you. I think bud tastes like wood [maybe cork], and coors tastes like yeast. Yingling [yeungeleung... yeungling... however it is spelled] has a saison yeast flavor. SNPA to me is nasty bittered sourness.

    I got some SAB and it seemed to me all hop bitterness and barley. I obtained two cases of both Great Lakes Dortmunder and Sam Adams Nobile Pils, from different stores, two months apart, and the first made me buy the second, while the second of each case made me stop [the second case of each tasted like crap... much like MGD (every other case tastes good or like crap)]. I have some Urquell and the barley and hop seem to be predominant.

    There is more to the flavor than the body and hop. The yeast has to be taken into consideration, as well as the fermenter's material, and then also the storeage [transporting] container, and then also the temperature at which it lived between fermenter and your glassware.

    I like MGD, as long as it tastes like it just came from the fermenter... otherwise it tastes like sun-killed yeast. So sunlight has something to do with it, but not just how it interacts with hops. Yet it is not the complete picture... I had MGD aluminum pounders from the local drug store that were awesome, and some that tasted like dead yeast. So not sun, but carriage temperature, has some impact.

    Added up, there are so many variables to even your favorite when you prefer a commercial brand that is inconsistent.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by msk
    I disagree with all of you. I think bud tastes like wood [maybe cork], and coors tastes like yeast. Yingling [yeungeleung... yeungling... however it is spelled] has a saison yeast flavor. SNPA to me is nasty bittered sourness.

    I like MGD, as long as it tastes like it just came from the fermenter... otherwise it tastes like sun-killed yeast.
    It's not a wonder that this place has gone downhill so quickly. Who invited the macro-swill fanboys? Hey chief, newsflash: Bud tastes like ass, and Coors is watery corn-based swill. What's next, a deconstruction of PBR's hop aroma? GET REAL.
    What contemptible scoundrel has stolen the cork to my lunch? --W.C. Fields

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