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Thread: Porter vs. Stout

  1. #1
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    Porter vs. Stout

    Can I ask for some opinions on what the major differences between a Porter and a Stout would be.
    I like both beers for the most part and am looking to brew a nice rich robust Porter. I would like to avoid crossing over into the land of Stout.
    Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

  2. #2
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    That is a big old fat can of worms, my friend. There is no definitive answer as to what separates the 2 styles, and there is a lot of crossover. Stouts evolved from porters over the years.
    One often used marker is that stouts use roasted barley, porters use black patent for the color and flavor. But my stouts and porters have both, just in different proportions.
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Oatmeal Stout, ESB
    Primary:Imperial HoppyRoggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Sticke Alt

  3. #3
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    I think Corky hit it on the head with his description. One thing I have noted in alot of craft porters is the taste of licorice. If you like this fine, it is not to my taste. I think one of the best examples of a robust porter is Great Lakes Edmund Fitzgerald.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by corkybstewart
    That is a big old fat can of worms, my friend. There is no definitive answer as to what separates the 2 styles, and there is a lot of crossover. Stouts evolved from porters over the years.
    One often used marker is that stouts use roasted barley, porters use black patent for the color and flavor. But my stouts and porters have both, just in different proportions.
    +1 Honestly the difference can be as simple as what the brewer chooses to call it. But For the sake of Definition, no roasted Barley= Porter Roasted Barley=Stout.
    The mind is like a beer, it does the most good when it is opened.

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  5. #5
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    Here's my well thought out comparison:
    Porters I can drink several. Stouts I'm usually done with one, maybe two.
    That's the difference to me. lol.

  6. #6
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    I just thought I would ask for some experienced opinions before I dabble with putting together a recipe.
    Im shooting for a well balanced robust porter that will be ready around november.
    I would be aiming for about 7-7.5%
    Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumplemintz
    I just thought I would ask for some experienced opinions before I dabble with putting together a recipe.
    Im shooting for a well balanced robust porter that will be ready around november.
    I would be aiming for about 7-7.5%
    There is a clone recipe for Edmund Fitzgerald in Zymurgy. I have it on my to brew list one of these days. Might be a good starting point for you. I believe you'll have to adjust things to get to that abv though.

  8. #8
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    Ill take a look, I could live with a abv in the 6 range.
    I thought I might like a Baltic style Porter but after sampling one it felt much more like a Scotch Ale.
    Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumplemintz
    Can I ask for some opinions on what the major differences between a Porter and a Stout would be.
    I like both beers for the most part and am looking to brew a nice rich robust Porter. I would like to avoid crossing over into the land of Stout.
    Are you all grain or Extract? If you want ill throw you a simple starting point Porter and stout recipe.
    The mind is like a beer, it does the most good when it is opened.

    Author of Bizarre Brews 101 Now for sale online!

    http://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000460972

    Or Just Google Bizarre Brews 101!

  10. #10
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    I'd be happy if you'd throw one up even if he doesn't need it
    Two ciders please, I'm thirsty!

    On deck: Soon Cider
    Fermenting: None
    bottled: Old and dusty something rathers
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    Kegged: Carbonated Water (enjoying home made soda syrups)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by maltyapples
    I'd be happy if you'd throw one up even if he doesn't need it
    Extract or all grain?
    The mind is like a beer, it does the most good when it is opened.

    Author of Bizarre Brews 101 Now for sale online!

    http://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000460972

    Or Just Google Bizarre Brews 101!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by vance71975
    Extract or all grain?
    extract please! Or partial mash.

    (there lies a bit of confusion for me, I'm all for using specialty grains but is that still called just extract, or does it become "partial mash"? and if not, what is partial mash??)
    Two ciders please, I'm thirsty!

    On deck: Soon Cider
    Fermenting: None
    bottled: Old and dusty something rathers
    Secondary: None
    Kegged: Carbonated Water (enjoying home made soda syrups)

  13. #13
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    partial mash is a situation where some of the fermentables are obtained by mashing a small amount of base malt. Extract with steeped grains means that the specialty grains are primarily there for flavor and/or color, think crystal malts, dark roasted, etc. They don't contribute much fermentable sugars but the do give your beer its body, color and some of the flavor.
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Oatmeal Stout, ESB
    Primary:Imperial HoppyRoggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Sticke Alt

  14. #14
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    Here are my recipes for oatmeal stout and porter so you can see the difference;
    Porter:
    8 pounds 2 row pale(extract use 6 pounds light LME)
    .75 pounds black patent(L525)
    .5 pounds chocolate (L350)
    .5 pounds Turbinado sugar
    Mash at 154
    1.5 oz Challenger 60 min
    1 oz Fuggles for 20 min
    WLP 005 or Nottingham

    Oatmeal stout:
    8 pounds 2 row pale(extract 6 pounds light LME)
    .5 pounds chocolate(L350)
    .75 pounds Roasted barley
    1.5 pounds flaked oats
    1/2 pound molasses
    Mash at 154
    Challenger-2 ozs for 60
    Fuggles- 1oz for 20
    WLP 004 or Safale-04
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Oatmeal Stout, ESB
    Primary:Imperial HoppyRoggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Sticke Alt

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    4,222
    Porters at one point in time were served sour.
    Olgethorpe is screening me!

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