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Thread: Bourbon dose

  1. #1
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    Bourbon dose

    Made an oatmeal stout:

    6 lb Maris Otter
    3 lb oatmeal (+ lots of rice hulls)
    1 lb roast barley
    1/2 lb crystal 55L

    1 oz Amarillo 8.7% at 60 min.

    1.056 OG

    US-05 yeast cake

    How much bourbon (Old Grand-Dad 86 proof) to be noticeable but not overwhelming?
    On deck: a clone of Carolina Beer Co's Rye Stout, clone of Breckenridge's Vanilla Porter,
    Primary: Schwarzbier
    Secondary: Dortmunder, Hopweizen
    Keg Conditioning: Dunkelweizen, Roggenbier, Okto, Ord. Bitter
    On tap: Alt, Hefeweizen, Cigar City Maduro clone, Mild
    Bottled: Mead, Quad Rajet, Granola Bar Braggot

    Too much of everything is just enough.
    - J. Garcia

  2. #2
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    I use 1/2 cup bourbon to soak vanilla beans for my vanilla porter. It's identifiable as bourbon but far from overpowering.
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Oatmeal Stout, ESB
    Primary:Imperial HoppyRoggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Sticke Alt

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by corkybstewart
    I use 1/2 cup bourbon to soak vanilla beans for my vanilla porter. It's identifiable as bourbon but far from overpowering.
    Sounds about right. I have went as high as 1 cup without the flavor being overpowering but i wasn't using bourbon i was using scotch.
    The mind is like a beer, it does the most good when it is opened.

    Author of Bizarre Brews 101 Now for sale online!

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by vance71975
    Sounds about right. I have went as high as 1 cup without the flavor being overpowering but i wasn't using bourbon i was using scotch.
    A teaspoon of Scotch would be just about perfect
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Oatmeal Stout, ESB
    Primary:Imperial HoppyRoggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Sticke Alt

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    46

    mashing oatmeal

    Thanks for the info Mill Rat... a question...

    From the looks of the grain bill, there isn't much difference (in weight) compared to 2 row, for instance, substituting oats for malted barley. It is slightly over ten pounds and getting O.G. like an all barley grain bill.

    Based on that fact, it looks like you can expect similar extraction efficiency from oats. Am I reading this right? Any significant differences in mash temp compared to malted barley?

    I need to branch out, and would like to try this! Do I need to mash differently that all barley recipe?
    Last edited by Pale Embiber; 10-20-2011 at 07:01 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by corkybstewart
    A teaspoon of Scotch would be just about perfect
    Lmao i love Scotch! i know i know im not OLD enough to be into scotch lol
    The mind is like a beer, it does the most good when it is opened.

    Author of Bizarre Brews 101 Now for sale online!

    http://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000460972

    Or Just Google Bizarre Brews 101!

  7. #7
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    @ Pale: You're right, most adjuncts will give you about the same extract per pound as a base malt. There's probably some difference that would show up when you're measuring your malt by the sack and not the pound, but it kinda fades into the background noise at a 5-gallon-batch level.

    I'm not sure how to answer your mash temp question. For the saccarification rest, no change from an all-barley batch, but at least with oats and rye, a protein rest (122-130 F) prior the sacc rest is beneficial to keep these brews from becoming gummy. Rice and corn would not need it.
    On deck: a clone of Carolina Beer Co's Rye Stout, clone of Breckenridge's Vanilla Porter,
    Primary: Schwarzbier
    Secondary: Dortmunder, Hopweizen
    Keg Conditioning: Dunkelweizen, Roggenbier, Okto, Ord. Bitter
    On tap: Alt, Hefeweizen, Cigar City Maduro clone, Mild
    Bottled: Mead, Quad Rajet, Granola Bar Braggot

    Too much of everything is just enough.
    - J. Garcia

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,015
    FWIW, I think the amount of bourbon also would depend on how strong/other flavors are present. My KBS with coffee and chocolate I soaked about a quarter of a pint glass worth of oak chips in an entire pint of bourbon and added it, oak and all, and it's definitely not too much. Still willing to share/trade btw as I still have a carboy in the cellar aging since 1/9/11.
    Last edited by Mikegobrew; 10-23-2011 at 09:38 PM.

  9. #9
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    Apr 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mill Rat
    @ Pale: You're right, most adjuncts will give you about the same extract per pound as a base malt. There's probably some difference that would show up when you're measuring your malt by the sack and not the pound, but it kinda fades into the background noise at a 5-gallon-batch level.

    I'm not sure how to answer your mash temp question. For the saccarification rest, no change from an all-barley batch, but at least with oats and rye, a protein rest (122-130 F) prior the sacc rest is beneficial to keep these brews from becoming gummy. Rice and corn would not need it.
    Yes, I just weigh grains on the scale anyway. Thanks for that clarification.

    Gummy? No gummy, please. I want clarity in the flavor and some body in the mouthfeel, not mushiness.

    I found out what is and how to do protein rest. So 122-130F allows proteases to break down proteins, and apparently use higher temps for generating longer proteins fragments which helps in head retention (whereas low range protein rest can result in short peptides, and poor head retention). Gee. I just thought I'd figured out how to hit the saccarification temp to get good yield. Now this. The idea of hitting 153F after a 125F protein rest will be a new challenge. One suggestion I have read is to add half a pint per lb at boiling temp to increase the temp from protein rest to 152-3F. I guess I'll just have to try!
    Last edited by Pale Embiber; 10-25-2011 at 03:23 PM.

  10. #10
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    Maybe gummy isn't the right word, but the result is to make the batch taste quite heavy-bodied. If you can direct-fire, it's easy, but with infusion mashing, it can be a bit harder to hit the target. Nice thing is that the proteases favor a thick mash, and amylases favor a thin mash. So you can make the mash 2/3-3/4 qt./lb. for the protein rest and then add boiling water to hit the sacc. rest temp without exceeding the capacity of your mash tun.
    On deck: a clone of Carolina Beer Co's Rye Stout, clone of Breckenridge's Vanilla Porter,
    Primary: Schwarzbier
    Secondary: Dortmunder, Hopweizen
    Keg Conditioning: Dunkelweizen, Roggenbier, Okto, Ord. Bitter
    On tap: Alt, Hefeweizen, Cigar City Maduro clone, Mild
    Bottled: Mead, Quad Rajet, Granola Bar Braggot

    Too much of everything is just enough.
    - J. Garcia

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by Mill Rat
    Maybe gummy isn't the right word, but the result is to make the batch taste quite heavy-bodied. If you can direct-fire, it's easy, but with infusion mashing, it can be a bit harder to hit the target. Nice thing is that the proteases favor a thick mash, and amylases favor a thin mash. So you can make the mash 2/3-3/4 qt./lb. for the protein rest and then add boiling water to hit the sacc. rest temp without exceeding the capacity of your mash tun.
    I think I know what you mean. "thick", "heavy", "dense", or maybe the right word is "viscous"

    I have been drinking good beer for about 2 decades, and I know some of the standard language for describing characteristics of beer. I need to find a good resource for a more expanded list of standard terms. Wine connoissuers have a complete lexicon of interesting, often lofty sounding ways to describe taste... buttery, woody, chewy, citrusy, peppery, oaky, even raisiny. My favorite is "funky". That could mean very different things to any individual. Practically meaningless. The terms I come up with to describe beer always seem pedestrian.

    A quick search and viola...
    http://tasteyourbeer.com/researchterms.php
    http://appellationbeer.com/blog/word...u-are-tasting/

    That was easy. Now I need to read them.
    Last edited by Pale Embiber; 11-04-2011 at 08:34 AM.

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