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Thread: Porter with a Pucker

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Porter with a Pucker

    I have a porter that is quite good, but I am thinking about doing a sour mash to give it a bit of twang (That way both my beer and my Texas accent can have a twang).

    The basic porter is very simple:
    8 lbs American 2 row malt
    1 lb Munich Malt
    1/2 lb Crystal Malt (90L)
    1/2 lb Black Patent
    1/2 lb Chocolate Malt
    1/2 lb Roasted Barley

    1/2 tsp Calcium Carbonate added to mash water (I will probably bump this up to a whole tsp next time. I had never used it before and wasn't sure of the hardness of the water I was using. I considered adding the other 1/2 at sparge, but don't know if this will make any impact.)

    1 oz Northern Brewer Hops
    1/2 oz Cascade Hops (both added at beginning of boil)
    1/2 oz Cascade Hops (added in last 5 minutes)

    Single step infusion mash

    Yeast was an American Ale style Smack Pack--I can't remember the exact.

    My OG was 1.050

    I'm thinking about reducing temperature after the mash and adding 1 lb of unground malt to inoculate with Lacto and sour for around 24 hours.

    What do you think? Any warnings, cautions or advice before I jump in on this one? It will be my first sour mash. I am very careful about sanitation so I must admit I am a bit wary about intentionally introducing bugs to my system. Should I add a second rest to my infusion mash? I've read that sour mashing can affect protein conversion.
    "The selling of bad beer is a crime against Christian love." 13th Century law of the city of Augsburg.

  2. #2
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    Jun 2010
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    I like it. That's pretty much the same specialty grain bill that I use on my Imperial Stout. I guess this one falls into the realm of "is that a stout or a porter?".

    If it were my porter, I'd replace the crystal 90 with Special B. If you really want it to taste like a porter, I'd remove the roasted barley and up the chocolate malt to .75, but that's just me. Either way, you have the makings of greatness here. Go with God.
    Last edited by Baacktoberfest; 11-04-2012 at 08:25 PM.
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  3. #3
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    It can be real hard to tell which is a porter and which is a stout. I've had the same beer served to two different people and had one say, "This is more of a stout," and another say, "This is more of a porter."

    What else do you add to your grain bill for the Impy?
    "The selling of bad beer is a crime against Christian love." 13th Century law of the city of Augsburg.

  4. #4
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    I'd call it a stout since it has the roasted barley in it along with the dark bill. Without the barley it'd be a porter (but that's my flimsy definition). Hope it turns out well, I haven't started delving into the sour beers yet. Minus the barley it looks just like a porter I made. Very tasty. Best of luck.
    Give me a woman who loves beer and I will conquer the world. (I think I may have found her!)

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cluckk
    It can be real hard to tell which is a porter and which is a stout. I've had the same beer served to two different people and had one say, "This is more of a stout," and another say, "This is more of a porter."

    What else do you add to your grain bill for the Impy?
    I leave out the Crystal 90 and add Special B. You'll also need enough marris otter to get to 13.8% ABV. It's one of my favorite five Impys, including commercial versions.

    Edit: .5# Special B to be exact.
    "Nothing matters
    but flopping on a mattress
    with cheap dreams and a beer."
    -Butowski

    Bottled: Maiden Voyage Imperial Stout, Dumpster Fire Cherry Ale & Belgian Dubbel
    Primary: Nothing-YIKES!
    On Deck: American Chauvinist Ale & Demon Concubine Black IPA

  6. #6
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    Apr 2005
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    Are you going to sour the whole malt bill for 24 hours? If I can't empty my mash tun for a day, if I brew late at night, the mash makes my garage smell like a football team locker room. It is nasty. I've never done a sour mash, but I would do a small mash (a pound or 2) the day before, let it sour and then add it to the main mash. But this is an untested idea I have, I probably read it somewhere.
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Crabapple Brett Blonde, Cherry Brett Blonde, Rye Stout,Sour Porter,Oatmeal Stout, Amarillo Wheat, Saison, ESB
    Primary:Pecan Smoked Roggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Porter/Vanilla Bourbon Porter,

  7. #7
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    Part of this is showing my neighbor the different options easily available in homebrewing. I'm thinking about mashing the porter and then running off enough second wort for a parti-gyle brown (ish). Then split the porter into two batches. To one add a soured mash made a couple days before from a small mash. Let these two ferment out side by side for comparisons. Then I might split the brown (ish) into two and ferment one with regular yeast and put the other on brett. Two different sources of souring and four very different beers from one grain bill.

    I may have to boost the parti-gyle with some DME but haven't done the calculations yet.

    As for the smell, my neighbor's son emptied the mash tun in my flower bed and didn't rinse it with the hose. The next day my front porch had a very funky odor.
    Last edited by cluckk; 11-07-2012 at 07:11 AM.
    "The selling of bad beer is a crime against Christian love." 13th Century law of the city of Augsburg.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    2,324
    Quote Originally Posted by cluckk
    I have a porter that is quite good, but I am thinking about doing a sour mash to give it a bit of twang (That way both my beer and my Texas accent can have a twang).

    The basic porter is very simple:
    8 lbs American 2 row malt
    1 lb Munich Malt
    1/2 lb Crystal Malt (90L)
    1/2 lb Black Patent
    1/2 lb Chocolate Malt
    1/2 lb Roasted Barley

    1/2 tsp Calcium Carbonate added to mash water (I will probably bump this up to a whole tsp next time. I had never used it before and wasn't sure of the hardness of the water I was using. I considered adding the other 1/2 at sparge, but don't know if this will make any impact.)

    1 oz Northern Brewer Hops
    1/2 oz Cascade Hops (both added at beginning of boil)
    1/2 oz Cascade Hops (added in last 5 minutes)

    Single step infusion mash

    Yeast was an American Ale style Smack Pack--I can't remember the exact.

    My OG was 1.050

    I'm thinking about reducing temperature after the mash and adding 1 lb of unground malt to inoculate with Lacto and sour for around 24 hours.

    What do you think? Any warnings, cautions or advice before I jump in on this one? It will be my first sour mash. I am very careful about sanitation so I must admit I am a bit wary about intentionally introducing bugs to my system. Should I add a second rest to my infusion mash? I've read that sour mashing can affect protein conversion.
    Sour it for 3-4 days if you really want to notice the pucker, in my personal experience 24 hours is barley noticeable at all.
    The mind is like a beer, it does the most good when it is opened.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by vance71975
    Sour it for 3-4 days if you really want to notice the pucker, in my personal experience 24 hours is barley noticeable at all.
    Comes stand in my garage with a full mash tun that's been there 24 hours . Even last week when the garage temps are barely into the 80's the mash from my ESB stank like fermented dirty gym socks.
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Crabapple Brett Blonde, Cherry Brett Blonde, Rye Stout,Sour Porter,Oatmeal Stout, Amarillo Wheat, Saison, ESB
    Primary:Pecan Smoked Roggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Porter/Vanilla Bourbon Porter,

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Rather than experimenting with it in this brew, I made a Kentucky Common. I produced a small mash and soured it for two days. I then added that to the kettle for boiling. I dedicated a small 2 gallon cooler to souring. When I opened it my daughter almost threw-up. However, I liked the smell and loved the taste of it--nice tart finish. Next time I try a larger amount and then let it sit for three days.
    "The selling of bad beer is a crime against Christian love." 13th Century law of the city of Augsburg.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by corkybstewart
    Comes stand in my garage with a full mash tun that's been there 24 hours . Even last week when the garage temps are barely into the 80's the mash from my ESB stank like fermented dirty gym socks.
    Ohio tends to but a bit colder than NM my friend, not to mention my mash tun seals and doesnt let the smell out! But yes in 24 hours you get the smell, but in my personal experience you need to wait 2 or 3 days before you really get the "sour" taste.
    Last edited by vance71975; 11-12-2012 at 10:30 PM.
    The mind is like a beer, it does the most good when it is opened.

    Author of Bizarre Brews 101 Now for sale online!

    http://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000460972

    Or Just Google Bizarre Brews 101!

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