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Thread: Hoses For New Kegerator

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    303

    Hoses For New Kegerator

    Where do I get hoses for my new kegerator.I didn't buy it so the hoses being provided was not an option.
    I built it myself.


    Can I just go to lows and get them to cut some hoses in their plumbing department? Or are there specific hoses I must use?
    If I can just get some at lowes, how long and what size?


    Thanks
    Currently finishing a keg of an Imperial Pumpkin Ale that I brewed for Christmas. The best Pumpkin ale I've ever had.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,695
    I would stick with food grade, at least for the liquid lines. I recommend a maximum ID of 3/16", which is a little tough to get onto the hose barbs (unless you soak the end in boiling hot H2O first), and it should be at least 5 feet long, and more is not a problem. the CO2 line is not nearly as critical, 1/4" ID will do, and length is not important. I usually go to McMaster-Carr (mcmaster.com) for hoses, post o-rings (AMSE -109 and -111) lid o-rings (-417). You can find the o-rings in FDA food-contact silicone, and there are several FDA hose types. Hate to say it, but mcmaster is by no means a cheap supply house, but they beat what you pay at home brew shops.
    Last edited by Mill Rat; 05-07-2013 at 05:53 PM.
    On deck: a clone of Carolina Beer Co's Rye Stout, clone of Breckenridge's Vanilla Porter,
    Primary: Schwarzbier
    Secondary: Dortmunder, Hopweizen
    Keg Conditioning: Dunkelweizen, Roggenbier, Okto, Ord. Bitter
    On tap: Alt, Hefeweizen, Cigar City Maduro clone, Mild
    Bottled: Mead, Quad Rajet, Granola Bar Braggot

    Too much of everything is just enough.
    - J. Garcia

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,439
    You can use braided fuel line hose from any auto parts store or big box hardware store, but Mill Rat is correct that the beer lines need to be food grade 3/16" ID, and that's harder to find. I have to buy it online from homebrew shops. If you have a local homebrew shop they'll probably have it. Don't let them sell you 1/4" ID, you'll have foam problems from day one.
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Crabapple Brett Blonde, Cherry Brett Blonde, Rye Stout,Sour Porter,Oatmeal Stout, Amarillo Wheat, Saison, ESB
    Primary:Pecan Smoked Roggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Porter/Vanilla Bourbon Porter,

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    475
    I stopped by my LHBS to check what brand they carry for beer line, and found it to be the same as what home depot carried, but at a higher price. I've had no off flavors from my beer line, but I do recommend food grade tubing nonetheless. I use a 10 foot line to bottle with, and a 7 ft line for serving (it happened to be a length I had sitting around). I haven't had any problems with the length, so I just stuck with it.
    Give me a woman who loves beer and I will conquer the world. (I think I may have found her!)

    On deck: Citra smash
    Fermenting: None
    bottled: Porter, lots of cider, IPA, honey ale, and esb.
    Secondary: Zip point squat
    Kegged: Amber Ale

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    303
    UPDATE:
    I went to my homebrew store and they hooked me up with the hoses that I needed. They were fairly cheap there. Nothing comparable was at Lowes or Home Depot (like people on other forums suggested).

    Below is a copy of the email my homebrew store sent me.

    "The hosing only needs to be about 3-4 ft for each. The gas line is $0.73 per
    foot and the liquid is $0.36. The gas line is 5/16 and the liquid line is 3/16.
    "

    Hope this helps.
    Brandon
    Currently finishing a keg of an Imperial Pumpkin Ale that I brewed for Christmas. The best Pumpkin ale I've ever had.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,439
    Those are great prices-morebeer.com sells them both for around $.60 per foot. Since I don't have a homebrew store within 200 miles(the good one is 280 miles away) I have to either buy from Lowes or online. That price for 3/16" beer line is excellent, but I would start with 5feet. There has to be friction to keep foaming to a minimum. At 12 psi, 37F, I've found that 7' of beerline works best for me.
    It's always time for a beer

    On tap:Crabapple Brett Blonde, Cherry Brett Blonde, Rye Stout,Sour Porter,Oatmeal Stout, Amarillo Wheat, Saison, ESB
    Primary:Pecan Smoked Roggenbier
    Bottled:2006 crabapple cider,Cherry Brett,Black Braggot,2 Prickly Pear Meads(1996 and 2006),Sour Pumpkin
    Lagering: Pecan Rauchbock
    Secondary: apple cider vinegar
    Next: Porter/Vanilla Bourbon Porter,

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,695
    As Corky said, buy the lines a bit on the long side. It's easy to trim them shorter. Cutting them longer is a trick.
    On deck: a clone of Carolina Beer Co's Rye Stout, clone of Breckenridge's Vanilla Porter,
    Primary: Schwarzbier
    Secondary: Dortmunder, Hopweizen
    Keg Conditioning: Dunkelweizen, Roggenbier, Okto, Ord. Bitter
    On tap: Alt, Hefeweizen, Cigar City Maduro clone, Mild
    Bottled: Mead, Quad Rajet, Granola Bar Braggot

    Too much of everything is just enough.
    - J. Garcia

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