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Thread: Wheat Beer

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Thanks Mill Rat. I seem to be a bit confused by the syntax, or something here. So we might alternatively say, "He'll have to be careful enough with his steep to ensure that it is a mash." ? Is that the point?
    Beerbreath
    "Beer; it's not just for breakfast anymore!"

  2. #47
    yes, exactly. Sorry for not being clear enough.
    -B'Dawg

    Give a man a beer and he'll waste an hour. Teach him to brew and he'll waste a lifetime. - Nuco Gordo

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Okay, I've got a silly question. What's the difference between steeping grains at 150-155 for 1/2 and hour and mashing them at 150-155 for 1/2 an hour?

  4. #49
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    Feb 2009
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    161
    Quote Originally Posted by BrewDog
    yes, exactly. Sorry for not being clear enough.
    Well, as you can see, I was misinterpreting or confused. Thanks for that confirmation, BD. You da man . . er, I mean you da DAWG!
    Beerbreath
    "Beer; it's not just for breakfast anymore!"

  5. #50
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    3,695
    Quote Originally Posted by Trashman
    Okay, I've got a silly question. What's the difference between steeping grains at 150-155 for 1/2 and hour and mashing them at 150-155 for 1/2 an hour?
    Spelling. {Posts must be at least 10 characters long.}
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  6. #51
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    148
    Quote Originally Posted by Trashman
    Okay, I've got a silly question. What's the difference between steeping grains at 150-155 for 1/2 and hour and mashing them at 150-155 for 1/2 an hour?
    Steeping is soaking, or making a tea. Gets starches and flavors out floating around for flavor, and sometimes for head.

    Mashing requires enzymes found in base malts. Causes some starches to convert into sugar. Gets flavor with less starch and more sugar.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    346
    Sooo... Burton Ale under my belt I'm going onto my next recipe a Raspberry Lemon Hefeweizen!

    I'm trying to make something my girlfriend will like and she loves the hefes. We've got tons of wild raspberries around right now so I was gonna utilize them!

    here's what I've been kicking around lemme know!

    4.25 lbs. American 2-row
    6.00 lbs. White Wheat Malt
    0.25 lbs. American Caramel 10°L
    0.33 oz. Amarillo (Pellets, 8.5 %AA) boiled 60 min.
    0.50 oz. Willamette (Pellets, 5 %AA) boiled 1 min.
    Yeast : WYeast 3333 German Wheat or 3068? not sure which

    Target OG: 1.047
    Target FG: 1.011
    Target IBU: 11.5 (Should/Could this be higher?)
    Target ABV: 4.7

    Don't know how long to ferment is at all...help!

    Gunna use the zest of 2 Meyer lemons (they're much more floral than normal lemons I've used them to make Lemoncello before) in the secondary

    I was gunna puree a few cups of wild raspberries and hold them at 155 for 10 min to pasteurize and then dump that into the secondary as well. I'm not sure how much I should add though, nor do I know when (should I add it when I rack to the carboy or add after the beers been in the secondary for a few days?)

    As always any and all criticism is desired!

    Cheers,

    Tronbie
    Last edited by Tronathon; 08-08-2010 at 10:27 AM.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    410
    I was told 2 lbs per gallon for fruit, though I don't know if you would change that with it being a wheat beer. I believe you want to rack onto the raspberry in the secondary and be sure to have a blowoff tube set up. My blueberry cream ale had a very explosive reaction. It depends on who you talk to as to whether you should cook them for a bit, I just tossed them right in after rinsing them and everything turn out fine.
    "You hands and feet are mangos, your gonna be a genius anyway." Phish


    Bottled: a little craft beer, cider
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  9. #54
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    Jul 2010
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    Woah 2lbs per gallon?! eash...that's gunna be a tough order, I just went out and collected 4 cups of raspberries and blackberries...but unfortunately I'm like 2 weeks late on raspberries season and the pickins are slim....

    So if I were to make a 5gallon batch I'm gunna need 10lbs of berries? that's like 20 cups of berries...only 16 more cups to go...

    thanks for the info

    Keep it coming,

    Tron

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    410
    Yeah, sounds about right, lol. I ended up using 9 lbs of blueberrys since the largest frozen bag I could find was 3 lbs and I was just to cheap to buy another bag for 1 lb. I would definitely go with puréeing or crushing the berries just to make sure they are all broken up, that is if you don't Pasturize them 1st.
    "You hands and feet are mangos, your gonna be a genius anyway." Phish


    Bottled: a little craft beer, cider
    Keg: Belgian-ish pale ale, Sunday Morning Ale
    Primary: Imperial Cream Stout, Falconers Flight IPA
    Secondary:
    Up next: something, something good, maybe
    Down the road: some kinda sour

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    346
    So I can use frozen berries? I was under the impression that wasn't as good...(I suppose that's cause fresh is always better but yeah...)

    So anyway, frozen is cool?

    Cheers,

    Tron
    It's like a chorus of angels riding whales through space.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    2,015
    I made a blackberry wheat with 6 lbs. of frozen blackberries in secondary with a blow off tube. The blackberry wasn't overwhelming and was a popular brew. I would freeze them and thaw them to rupture the cells but I personally wouldn't cook them first. Be prepared to have stained hands for a day or so afterward.

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    410
    +1 on the stains,lol. My sink, an old porcelain one, was stained blue/purple for a few days.
    "You hands and feet are mangos, your gonna be a genius anyway." Phish


    Bottled: a little craft beer, cider
    Keg: Belgian-ish pale ale, Sunday Morning Ale
    Primary: Imperial Cream Stout, Falconers Flight IPA
    Secondary:
    Up next: something, something good, maybe
    Down the road: some kinda sour

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    346
    So don't cook em? how do you ensure they're sterile before putting them in the secondary?

    Just assume that the freezing kills bacteria?

    Tronathon
    It's like a chorus of angels riding whales through space.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    2,015
    Quote Originally Posted by Tronathon
    So don't cook em? how do you ensure they're sterile before putting them in the secondary?

    Just assume that the freezing kills bacteria?

    Tronathon
    Well... I... Uh... you see... Um...

    Basically we can only sanitize not sterlize and by adding them post fermentation to a brew that was about 5% ABV and then ferments the fruit and probably adds another 1.5-2.0% ABV I didn't worry. Plus I researched it and most that turned out the best weren't cooked. I figure we worry too much about sanitation sometimes today. What did they use to sanitize long ago?
    I still have ONE lonely bottle left. I drank one about a month ago and it was still pretty darn good.

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