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Thread: Irish Red

  1. #46
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    Dec 2005
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    1,954
    I keep meaning to brew a simple Irish Red, but other brewing plans keep getting in the way. I'm thinking of using 2-row, munich, and carared for malt, and a touch of roasted barley to give some dryness.
    Primary: Belgian Dark Strong
    Secondary: Flanders Red 10, Flanders Red 08/09
    Bottle Conditioning: Cyser
    Kegged: DIPA
    Drinking: Witbier, IPA, Flanders Red 08/09, Vanilla Brown Ale, Black DIPA, Imperial Chocolate Brown Ale, Cascade/Centennial IPA, Imperial Witbier, English Barleywine, Historical Imperial Stout, Belgian Dark Strong, US Barleywine

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    7,349
    Originally posted by markaberrant
    I keep meaning to brew a simple Irish Red, but other brewing plans keep getting in the way. I'm thinking of using 2-row, munich, and carared for malt, and a touch of roasted barley to give some dryness.
    Same story for me, but I planned to use some crystal as the style should have some caramel notes.
    My posts are definitive. Reality is frequently inaccurate.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    1,954
    Originally posted by HogieWan
    Same story for me, but I planned to use some crystal as the style should have some caramel notes.
    I agree with you, so I might use caramunich instead of munich. And I actually plan to use Maris Otter, not 2-row, and carared is a caramel malt, so I should get a malty caramel red ale.
    Primary: Belgian Dark Strong
    Secondary: Flanders Red 10, Flanders Red 08/09
    Bottle Conditioning: Cyser
    Kegged: DIPA
    Drinking: Witbier, IPA, Flanders Red 08/09, Vanilla Brown Ale, Black DIPA, Imperial Chocolate Brown Ale, Cascade/Centennial IPA, Imperial Witbier, English Barleywine, Historical Imperial Stout, Belgian Dark Strong, US Barleywine

  4. #49
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    404
    Originally posted by noby
    thekulman, I brewed a variation of your recipe lastnight ... Got about 21L, at 1.041. Really pleased with how it looks so far. Thanks for the recipe.

    Cormac.
    Hi Cormac - have you sampled your Irish Red yet? I'm interested to see how it turned out

    Brian (thekulman)
    www.homebrewersretail.com
    www.homebrewersretail.com - 2 row always $1.10/lb (Canada Malting)
    We now carry Wyeast Activator packs and 5 Star products.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    87
    I just brewed somewhat of an irish red. I'd like to hear your comments.

    5 pds Light DME
    1/2 pd honey
    3/4 pd dark brown sugar
    1 pd munich malt
    1 pd 20L crystal malt

    1.5 oz mt hood hops 60 minutes
    Muntons dry yeast

    It was in the required specs of a red irish ale according to beer tools.
    The OG only came out 1.046, was suppose to be 1.053 but I think I didn't get what I needed from the grains. I put them in a gallon of cold water, brought the temp up to 160. turned off heat and covered with lid and let rest 30 minutes. Then drained off liquid into new pot and sparged graings with 1 gallon of 170 degrees water.

    It tastes good but wasn't sure if this really fits an irish red style.

    thoughts

    DC

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    87
    I just brewed somewhat of an irish red. I'd like to hear your comments.

    5 pds Light DME
    1/2 pd honey
    3/4 pd dark brown sugar
    1 pd munich malt
    1 pd 20L crystal malt

    1.5 oz mt hood hops 60 minutes
    Muntons dry yeast

    It was in the required specs of a red irish ale according to beer tools.
    The OG only came out 1.046, was suppose to be 1.053 but I think I didn't get what I needed from the grains. I put them in a gallon of cold water, brought the temp up to 160. turned off heat and covered with lid and let rest 30 minutes. Then drained off liquid into new pot and sparged graings with 1 gallon of 170 degrees water.

    It tastes good but wasn't sure if this really fits an irish red style.

    thoughts

    DC

  7. #52
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,695
    If you like the beer, don't get work up about being "to style." That's just asking for ulcers you don't need or deserve. Good beer judges will give higher marks to well-made beer that is on the fringe of a style than a mediocre one that is spot-on, anyway.

    As for getting better efficiency from the grains you use, you seem to be giving them the requisite time, so I'd recommend improving circulation of your steep water through the grain. You can achieve this by using a larger grain bag or multiple grain bags so the grain isn't packed into a tight ball, but is more loosely held. The best way to use bags for grains or hops is to have the contents of the bags almost as loose as they'd be if they were floating free in your steep water or wort. You can also dip it in and out of the steep water to better rinse the sugars out of the grains.
    On deck: a clone of Carolina Beer Co's Rye Stout, clone of Breckenridge's Vanilla Porter,
    Primary: Schwarzbier
    Secondary: Dortmunder, Hopweizen
    Keg Conditioning: Dunkelweizen, Roggenbier, Okto, Ord. Bitter
    On tap: Alt, Hefeweizen, Cigar City Maduro clone, Mild
    Bottled: Mead, Quad Rajet, Granola Bar Braggot

    Too much of everything is just enough.
    - J. Garcia

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    87
    I didn't have the grains in a bag. I put them in a strainer and poured a gallon of 170 degree water over them. It went through pretty fast. Didn't know if it would be ok to use water already in pot that has been through grains and resparge with it or if that's not doing any good.

    thanks for the input. I think I didn't mix it well enough before taking asample for the OG cause it tastes fine.


    thanks again

    DC

  9. #54
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,695
    The trick is to get the water to sparge through evenly. If this strainer is the normal half-round shape, most will flow to the edges and miss the stuff in the middle. Maybe hollow out a spot in the middle to get more even flow. If you're enjoying the beer, that's all that really matters in the end.
    On deck: a clone of Carolina Beer Co's Rye Stout, clone of Breckenridge's Vanilla Porter,
    Primary: Schwarzbier
    Secondary: Dortmunder, Hopweizen
    Keg Conditioning: Dunkelweizen, Roggenbier, Okto, Ord. Bitter
    On tap: Alt, Hefeweizen, Cigar City Maduro clone, Mild
    Bottled: Mead, Quad Rajet, Granola Bar Braggot

    Too much of everything is just enough.
    - J. Garcia

  10. #55
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    404
    Hi there;

    You used mostly DME, the steeped grains where mainly for additional flavours and colour, not so much as for efficientcy.

    Looks good, and if it tasts good... well, MillRat said it best.

    I personally find Brew Smith to be off a bit on recipe formation and use Pro Mash myself, that's a lot of sugar for an Irish Red (honey included), it should be very sweet.

    Your methods sound like they were based on Charlie Papazian's books - which is the way I did it before going all grain.

    Keep up the good work and cheers!

    Brian
    www.homebrewersretail.com
    www.homebrewersretail.com - 2 row always $1.10/lb (Canada Malting)
    We now carry Wyeast Activator packs and 5 Star products.

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    87
    I used Beer Tools to formulate the recipe. Origionally I was leaning toward a light bock or Brown ale. I went with what ingrdients I had on hand other than the malt. After having the recipe together I checked different styles to see which one all the ingredients came closet too and Irish Red and American Brown were the two that fit it best. I used the sugars to save money on malt and still get the OG where it needed to be. It tasts good so far.

    Thanks for the help
    DC

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    87
    Fermentation has slowed down big time in my irish red. I took off blowoff tube and put airlock on. Took a sample and took a gravity reading. It's at 1.013. Tastes like a flat Killian Irish red. Not bad.

    Really looking forward to drinking it.


    DC

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    87
    End result is the red ale is very good. Mild, and doesn't taste thin at all like I thought it would. I'll be brewing this again soon. Everyone that has tried it loved it. I will probably add more malt and use 40% efficiency in calculations next time vs 70% that beer tools uses automatically. Thanks for al lthe help.

    Currently I have a cream stout that is about ready to bottle and a wheat beer I will be adding lemon zest to in secondary. both beers are 3 gallons recipes. The wheat beer had a very sour smell for two days but that is gone and it smells fine. I used WL320 yeast and cascade hops. There was a bnug floating in it and I thought it had contaminated it but all seems ok for now. I'll give it a taste before adding the lemon zest. The recipe is the Lemon Lingire posted on this site. It came out darker than expected but I added sugar to boil so that probably darkened it and it was extract so that was a factor too.

    I'll be having surgury on the 31st fot a cochlear implant and I wanted to be sure I had plenty of "pain killer" available. Drink two every 6 hours as needed for pain and to reduce effect of reality.

    DC

  14. #59
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    404
    Hey deafcone;

    Sorry to hear (no pun intended) about the surgery. Hope it all goes well and glad to hear that the Irish Red turned out. It's also my favourite beer and house standard. All my friends love it!

    Cheers for now!

    Brian
    www.homebrewersretail.com
    www.homebrewersretail.com - 2 row always $1.10/lb (Canada Malting)
    We now carry Wyeast Activator packs and 5 Star products.

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    87
    Originally posted by thekulman
    Hey deafcone;

    Sorry to hear (no pun intended) about the surgery. Hope it all goes well and glad to hear that the Irish Red turned out. It's also my favourite beer and house standard. All my friends love it!

    Cheers for now!

    Brian
    www.homebrewersretail.com
    The surgury is voluntary. I am deaf in both ears and the implant is a small computerized device that will be implanted in the bone above the ear with an electrode placed near the cochlea and I'll wear a processor much like a behind the ear hearing aid that will send signals to the implant eventually allowing me to hear again. It bypasses the middle ear where most of hearing losses occur.It's the only option for me to be able to hear so i'm going for it.

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