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Thread: Vanilla Stout Recipe (Extract)

  1. #1
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    Vanilla Stout Recipe (Extract)

    I want to make a nice creamy, vanilla stout. Anyone have any recipes or know a good way to impart vanilla flavor into the beer.

    Thanks!
    "Fermentation may have been a greater discovery than fire" ~ David Rains Wallace

  2. #2
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    Dry "hop" it with a split vanilla bean just like Old Dominion does in their bottled Oak Barrel Stout. Couldn't tell you how much to use but I will say to watch it carefully. Vanilla can go a long way and once it's present it's pretty much there to stay.
    myLocal-Home-Brew-Shop
    Your ultimate hobby headquarters.
    (703) 241-3874 * www.myLHBS.com

  3. #3
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    Beefsteak,

    I just sent you a PM.

    - D
    myLocal-Home-Brew-Shop
    Your ultimate hobby headquarters.
    (703) 241-3874 * www.myLHBS.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Originally posted by Derekt2
    Beefsteak,

    I just sent you a PM.

    - D
    no secrets!
    My posts are definitive. Reality is frequently inaccurate.

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by HogieWan
    no secrets!
    But it was about you.
    "Fermentation may have been a greater discovery than fire" ~ David Rains Wallace

  6. #6
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    If it's about the vanilla stout, I wouldn't mind some insight.
    Actually, it only takes one drink to get me loaded. Trouble is, I can't remember if it's the thirteenth or fourteenth.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by Bruno_78
    If it's about the vanilla stout, I wouldn't mind some insight.
    Nah, it wasn't.
    "Fermentation may have been a greater discovery than fire" ~ David Rains Wallace

  8. #8
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    When I made my vanilla porter I scraped two beans and added it to a shot of rum (I really wanted Vodka, but bought the wrong mini-bottle). I added this to the bottom of the secondary when I transferred from primary. It seems to have worked well, the beer has a hint of vanilla, but not over powering.
    "To beer, the cause of and solution to all of life's problems" - Homer Simpson

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by Jeff
    When I made my vanilla porter I scraped two beans and added it to a shot of rum (I really wanted Vodka, but bought the wrong mini-bottle). I added this to the bottom of the secondary when I transferred from primary. It seems to have worked well, the beer has a hint of vanilla, but not over powering.
    Sounds perfect.

    I'm also hoping for a nice creamy quality to the beer. Any suggestions on how to achieve that? I was searching around for some suggestions and found a few (lactose, flaked oats)...would those give my beer creaminess?

    Thanks.
    "Fermentation may have been a greater discovery than fire" ~ David Rains Wallace

  10. #10
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    Here's my proposed recipe for an extract + steeped grains Vanilla Cream Stout:

    6.6 lbs. Dark malt extract
    1/2 lb. lactose
    3/4 lb. Crystal 50L
    1/4 lb. Chocolate malt
    1 oz. Northern Brewer bittering hops
    Wyeast 1318 London Ale III yeast
    3/4 cup priming sugar

    2 Vanilla beans added to fermenter.

    Any feedback is appreciated...thanks!

    ~ Sean
    "Fermentation may have been a greater discovery than fire" ~ David Rains Wallace

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Originally posted by Beefsteak
    Here's my proposed recipe for an extract + steeped grains Vanilla Cream Stout:

    6.6 lbs. Dark malt extract
    1/2 lb. lactose
    3/4 lb. Crystal 50L
    1/4 lb. Chocolate malt
    1 oz. Northern Brewer bittering hops
    Wyeast 1318 London Ale III yeast
    3/4 cup priming sugar

    2 Vanilla beans added to fermenter.

    Any feedback is appreciated...thanks!

    ~ Sean
    You need some roast barley to make that into a stout. If you are sure that your proposed recipe generally represents the type of beer you wish to make, I would suggest the following substitutions:
    Light malt extract for the dark malt extract
    Between .5# and .75# roast barley
    Between .5# and .75# chocolate malt

    I've never used lactose in a beer, so I cannot give you any pointers in that area. But for your vanilla beans, the way I did it in my vanilla stout, I cut the bean lengthwise, scraped the insides with a knife blade, and added both the husks and the interior matter into a glass. I topped that off with just enough vodka to cover it all, and let it sit for a day. Then I added it to my secondary fermenter.
    Primary: Mead
    Secondary: Dry Irish Stout
    Bottle/Keg Conditioning: Weizenbock, Dunkleweizen, Cider, Mead, Porter, IPA
    Drinking: Drunk Santa Ale, Chocolate Vanilla Stout, Ginger "Day-walker" Ale, Owen's Brown Pinkie Ale
    Up Next: Irish Stout, Blackwine, Witbier

  12. #12
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    Talking nice thread

    i'm quite interested, keep the comments coming, please.
    a nice creamy vanilla stout sounds good right about now.

    - by the way, that rum mistake sounds like it would go beautifully,
    I'd suggest throwing in some captain morgans for the hell of it, although i'm guessing you'll then have more sugars to boost the alc. and need some slightly more powerful yeast to do it with.

    - and while you're at it, let it sit on some oak chips as well...

  13. #13
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    Ok, updated recipe based on feedback:

    6.6 lbs light LME
    1/2 lb crystal malt
    1/2 lb chocolate malt
    1/2 lb roasted barley malt
    1/2 lb lactose
    2 vanilla beans (soaked in vodka, added to secondary)
    1 oz. Northern Brewer bittering hops
    Wyeast 1318 London Ale III yeast
    "Fermentation may have been a greater discovery than fire" ~ David Rains Wallace

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    598
    I throw torrified wheat into a lot of beers just to had to head retention and mouth feel. Not sure in anybody else does this, but seems to have worked well for me. I usually add 1/4 to 1/2 lb.
    "To beer, the cause of and solution to all of life's problems" - Homer Simpson

  15. #15
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    Jan 2005
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    234
    Ok, so I brewed this yesterday:

    6.6 lbs light LME
    1/2 lb dark crystal malt
    1 lb Belgian chocolate malt
    1/2 lb roasted barley
    1/2 lb lactose
    1/2 lb. malto-dextgin
    1 oz. Perle
    White Labs Irish Ale Yeast

    All looked good until I took a gravity reading when I noticed that the beer was not dark and "stout-like" in color. It was more of a dark copper color. My last beer, a porter turned out a similiar color.

    I steeped the grains in 2.5 galloons of water for 30 minutes at 155F, removed them, then brought it up to a boil. Added extract/lactose/dextrin and hops then boiled for one hour.

    Any ideas as to why they are turning out too light? I'm guessing not, but is there anyway I can darken the beer before bottling?

    Thanks,
    Sean
    "Fermentation may have been a greater discovery than fire" ~ David Rains Wallace

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